Salt Therapy for Skin Conditions

The main areas covered here are:

 

Eczema

In addition to the clinically proven beneficial effects of Salt Therapy for respiratory disorders, Salt Therapy is also shown to be effective in the treatment of skin disorders such as eczema, dermatitis and psoriasis, which often co-exist with asthma. If you are suffering from eczema, salt therapy will have a positive effect on the blood microcirculation of the skin normalising your Ph whilst killing bacteria and reducing inflammation.

As an antiseptic salt neutralises the irritants and allergens our skin typically reacts to. Its anti-inflammatory properties reduce inflammation of the skin that causes itching.

As an antibacterial agent salt bonds with the moisture in the skin, thus creating an antibacterial substance, that protects the skin from germs & infection.

After a series of treatments, clients show decreased itching, decreased or resolved scaling of the skin, with the drying and healing of small fissures and scratches.

Eczema is a general term for many types of skin inflammation, also known as dermatitis. The most common form of eczema is atopic dermatitis(some people use these two terms interchangeably). However, there are many different forms of eczema.

Eczema can affect people of any age, although the condition is most common in infants, and about 85% of people have an onset prior to 5 years of age. Eczema will permanently resolve by age 3 in about half of affected infants. In others, the condition tends to recur throughout life. People with eczema often have a family history of the condition or a family history of other allergic conditions, such as asthma or hay fever. Up to 20% of children and 1%-2% of adults are believed to have eczema. Eczema is slightly more common in girls than in boys. It occurs in people of all races.

Eczema is not contagious, but since it is believed to be at least partially inherited, it is not uncommon to find members of the same family affected.

What are the causes of eczema?

Doctors do not know the exact cause of eczema, but a defect of the skin that impairs its function as a barrier, possibly combined with an abnormal function of the immune system, are believed to be an important factors. Studies have shown that in people with atopic dermatitis, there are gene defects that lead to abnormalities in certain proteins (such as filaggrin) that are important in maintaining the barrier of normal skin.

Some forms of eczema can be triggered by substances that come in contact with the skin, such as soaps, cosmetics, clothing, detergents, jewelry, or sweat. Environmental allergens (substances that cause allergic reactions) may also cause outbreaks of eczema. Changes in temperature or humidity, or even psychological stress, can lead to outbreaks of eczema in some people.

What are the symptoms of eczema?

Eczema most commonly causes dry, reddened skin that itches or burns, although the appearance of eczema varies from person to person and varies according to the specific type of eczema. Intense itching is generally the first symptom in most people with eczema. Sometimes, eczema may lead to blisters and oozing lesions, but eczema can also result in dry and scaly skin. Repeated scratching may lead to thickened, crusty skin.

While any region of the body may be affected by eczema, in children and adults, eczema typically occurs on the face, neck, and the insides of the elbows, knees, and ankles. In infants, eczema typically occurs on the forehead, cheeks, forearms, legs, scalp, and neck.

Eczema can sometimes occur as a brief reaction that only leads to symptoms for a few hours or days, but in other cases, the symptoms persist over a longer time and are referred to as chronic dermatitis.

Back to the top

 

Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis is a very common, often chronic (long-lasting) skin disease that affects a large percentage of the world's population. It is also called eczema, dermatitis, or atopy. Most commonly, it may be thought of as a type of skin allergy or sensitivity. The atopic dermatitis triad includes asthma, allergies (hay fever), and eczema. There is a known hereditary component of the disease, and it is seen more in some families. The hallmarks of the disease include skin rashes and itching.

The word "dermatitis" means inflammation of the skin. "Atopic" refers to diseases that are hereditary, tend to run in families, and often occur together. In atopic dermatitis, the skin becomes extremely itchy and inflamed, causing redness, swelling, cracking, weeping, crusting, and scaling. Dry skin is a very common complaint and an underlying cause of some of the typical rash symptoms.

Although atopic dermatitis can occur in any age, most often it affects infants and young children. In some instances, it may persist into adulthood or actually first show up later in life. A large number of patients tend to have a long-term course with various ups and downs. In most cases, there are periods of time when the disease is worse, called exacerbations or flares, which are followed by periods when the skin improves or clears up entirely, called remissions. Many children with atopic dermatitis enter into a permanent remission of the disease when they get older, although their skin may remain somewhat dry and easily irritated.

Multiple factors can trigger or worsen atopic dermatitis, including dry skin, seasonal allergies, exposure to harsh soaps and detergents, new skin products or creams, and cold weather. Environmental factors can activate symptoms of atopic dermatitis at any time in the lives of individuals who have inherited the atopic disease trait.

What causes atopic dermatitis?

The cause of atopic dermatitis is not known, but the disease seems to result from a combination of genetic (hereditary) and environmental factors. There seems to be a basic hypersensitivity and an increased tendency toward itching. Evidence suggests that the disease is associated with other so-called atopic disorders such as hay fever (seasonal allergies) and asthma, which many people with atopic dermatitis also have. In addition, many children who outgrow the symptoms of atopic dermatitis go on to develop hay fever or asthma. Although one disorder does not necessarily cause another, they may be related, thereby giving researchers clues to understanding atopic dermatitis.

  • Irritants - soaps, solvents and drying compounds. Odorless, liquid detergent is preferable as well as loose fitting, cotton clothing.
  • Allergens - airborne substances and foods. (these are not the only allergens for atopic dermatitis) One way to identify allergens is through allergy testing, but your doctor will decide what is necessary.
  • Infections - bacterial, viral, and fungal infections can trigger flare‐ups. Severe flare‐ups can be caused particularly by Herpes simplex and Herpes zoster (chicken pox) Eliminating bacteria can be accomplished through a bleach bath. For 1 ½ feet of water in an average sized bath tub add 1/8 cup of Clorox bleach. After soaking for 20 minutes, rinse the skin thoroughly and take a shower or bath. Use a towel (white is preferable in case bleach is still present on the skin) to blot dry. This process can be performed two to three times a week. If skin has not improved in one week, notify your physician.
  • Emotional Stress - While emotional factors and stress may in some cases exacerbate or initiate the condition, they do not seem to be a primary or underlying cause for the disorder. In the past, there was some thought that perhaps atopic dermatitis was entirely caused by an emotional disorder.

Back to the top

 

Psoriasis

Psoriasis (sore-EYE-ah-sis) is a medical condition that occurs when skin cells grow too quickly. Faulty signals in the immune system cause new skin cells to form in days rather than weeks.

The body does not shed these excess skin cells, so the cells pile up on the surface of the skin and lesions form.

Psoriasis is a common and chronic skin disorder. Plaque psoriasis is the most common type of psoriasis and is characterized by red skin covered with silvery scales and inflammation. Patches of circular to oval shaped red plaques that itch or burn are typical of plaque psoriasis.

Psoriasis is a non-contagious, chronic skin disorder that usually is a mild condition. It causes red, scaling patches on the skin. It is a chronic disorder, which means that the symptoms may last for years. They may come and go throughout life. It affects men and women equally.

Psoriasis is a noncontagious common skin condition that causes rapid skin cell reproduction resulting in red, dry patches of thickened skin. The dry flakes and skin scales are thought to result from the rapid buildup of skin cells. Psoriasis commonly affects the skin of the elbows, knees, and scalp.

Causes of Psoriasis

  1. Heredity - If one parent is affected then there is 15% of chances for the child to suffer from psoriasis. If both the parents are affected then the possibility of child getting the psoriasis is 60%.
  2. Throat infections trigger psoriasis.
  3. Trauma or hurt on skin like cuts, bruises or burns may cause psoriasis.
  4. Some medicines or skin irritants initiate psoriasis.
  5. Smoking and alcohol are other two factors which activate psoriasis.

Back to the top